Taipei Celebrates Our Pride

There’s never been a better time for GLBTQ travelers to come to Taiwan. Arguably Asia’s most progressive country (Taiwan’s military struck down sexuality-based discrimination way back in 2002), just this year our highest court ruled in favor of same-sex marriage, clearing the way for full marriage equality. And if there’s never been a better time to visit Taiwan, there’s no better time of year than late October. For starters, the weather is great, with the hot summer behind and wet winter yet to come. More importantly, October is when Taipei’s Pride festival, the largest Gay event in Taiwan and a major global pride event occurs.

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Shaping the Memories of a Century: Master Guo Gengfu’s Life of Mortar Shaping

As one visits temples in Taiwan, the traditional architecture and the decorative crafts of the interior always leave one in awe. Each temple looks and feels like a huge art installation made by way of extraordinary skills, and each of them showcases the devotion and uniqueness of the craftsman.

The Guo-Chen family is one of the few families specializing in the craft of mortar shaping in Taiwan today, and at the head of the family is Master Guo Gengfu (郭亘富).

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An ancient Chinese tradition made modern: Taiwan’s 2019 Kaohsiung Neimen Song Jiang Battle Array

Taiwan is rich in festivals celebrating local folk religions, community and cultural pride. Visitors lucky enough to find themselves in Kaohsiung’s Neimen district during the week of March 29th- April 6 were in for a rare spectacle indeed as the normally quiet town well north of Taiwan’s bustling southern metropolis played host to the annual Song Jiang Battle Array.

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Spring in Taipei : Calendar of Good Times

Spring is indeed a time for celebrating. What better place for it than a city that seems to exemplify the essence of spring itself? Here are 9 things you should do in Taipei during Spring.

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The Mazu Pilgrimage Experience

Named by the Discovery Channel as one of the top three religious festivals in the world, the Dajia Mazu holy pilgrimage attracts large numbers of people of Chinese descent from abroad and foreign travelers alike. What makes the Mazu pilgrimage so special and fascinating that participants keep walking, determined to never look back, even when they have painful blisters on their feet?

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Baosheng Cultural Festival: A Festive Event Full of History, Religion and Community

The Baosheng Cultural Festival (保生文化祭) is an excellent opportunity to immerse yourself in Taiwanese culture. Originally a birthday party for Baosheng Emperor (保生大帝), the god of medicine, the festivities have grown into a two month-long celebration of Taiwan’s history and culture. At the center of it all is Dalongdong Baoan Temple (大龍峒保安宮) in Taipei, where the deity Baosheng Emperor celebrates his birthday during the third lunar month.

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A Day in Historic Ximen

Ximen is one of those neighborhoods that almost every visitor to Taipei ventures into. The casual visitor’s first impression after ascending from the MRT is a sea of bright lights cascading into a large pedestrian shopping area packed with thousands of people out for an evening stroll, on their way to see a film, go shopping or have dinner.

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Literature Is Alive and Well in Taiwan!

Though it’s become fashionable to declare the death of print media, visitors to this year’s Taipei International Book Exhibition would probably disagree with the sentiment. According to Taiwan’s Ministry of Culture, 580,000 people attended the 2019 event, which ran from February twelfth through the seventeenth. It’s an impressive number, but not totally shocking. Taiwan is…

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Lantern Festivals, Rice Dumplings, and Other Taiwanese Traditions

Yuanxiao Jie, or Lantern Festival, commemorates the end of the Lunar New Year Holidays. At this time, parades and festivals are held around Taiwan.

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Eight Taiwan Lantern Festivals (that aren’t the one you think)

In Chinese, Yuánxiāo jié means Lantern Festival, and while most visitors associate the term with the town of Pingxi (which has turned the annual event into a year-long cottage industry), in fact the festival is a specific happening meant to denote the end of the annual Lunar New Year’s festival.

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