The Etiquette for Sending Flowers in Taiwan: Do’s and Don’ts

WORDS BY Jenna Lynn Cody PHOTOS BY Artsy Vibes, César Gaviriam, Niccole Lim, Alisa Anton, Natasha Welingkar, Rebecca Matthews Taiwan is an island with a huge variety of flowers. Orange daylilies blanket the east coast mountains in late summer. Calla lilies draw visitors to Yangmingshan in early spring, competing with the kapok trees flowering in…

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Shaping the Memories of a Century: Master Guo Gengfu’s Life of Mortar Shaping

As one visits temples in Taiwan, the traditional architecture and the decorative crafts of the interior always leave one in awe. Each temple looks and feels like a huge art installation made by way of extraordinary skills, and each of them showcases the devotion and uniqueness of the craftsman.

The Guo-Chen family is one of the few families specializing in the craft of mortar shaping in Taiwan today, and at the head of the family is Master Guo Gengfu (郭亘富).

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An ancient Chinese tradition made modern: Taiwan’s 2019 Kaohsiung Neimen Song Jiang Battle Array

Taiwan is rich in festivals celebrating local folk religions, community and cultural pride. Visitors lucky enough to find themselves in Kaohsiung’s Neimen district during the week of March 29th- April 6 were in for a rare spectacle indeed as the normally quiet town well north of Taiwan’s bustling southern metropolis played host to the annual Song Jiang Battle Array.

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Breakfast in Taipei: Start Your Day Like a Local!

If you’re visiting Taipei, there’s no better (or culturally appropriate) way to start your day than with a traditional Taiwanese breakfast. First-time visitors to Taipei are often amazed at the breadth and depth of what’s available for breakfast on the streets of Taipei (not to mention how early breakfast joints start opening – the Taiwanese tend to rise early).

Some traditional Taiwanese breakfast items have western counterparts, while others will be familiar to anyone who’s traveled in China, Japan or Korea. But a few items are definitely uniquely Taiwanese. In this article, we’ll be looking at a few dishes that Taipei people eat in the mornings and suggesting a few spots for visitors to find them during their early-morning journeys around Taipei.

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Hiking through Taiwan’s great outdoors: A Long Walk On the Old DanLan Trail

Taiwan Scene’s Editor-in-Chief spends the day hiking on a historic trail connecting Taipei City and Yilan, getting out of the city and exploring Taiwan’s natural outdoor beauty.

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Spring in Taipei : Calendar of Good Times

Spring is indeed a time for celebrating. What better place for it than a city that seems to exemplify the essence of spring itself? Here are 9 things you should do in Taipei during Spring.

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The Mazu Pilgrimage Experience

Named by the Discovery Channel as one of the top three religious festivals in the world, the Dajia Mazu holy pilgrimage attracts large numbers of people of Chinese descent from abroad and foreign travelers alike. What makes the Mazu pilgrimage so special and fascinating that participants keep walking, determined to never look back, even when they have painful blisters on their feet?

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Baosheng Cultural Festival: A Festive Event Full of History, Religion and Community

The Baosheng Cultural Festival (保生文化祭) is an excellent opportunity to immerse yourself in Taiwanese culture. Originally a birthday party for Baosheng Emperor (保生大帝), the god of medicine, the festivities have grown into a two month-long celebration of Taiwan’s history and culture. At the center of it all is Dalongdong Baoan Temple (大龍峒保安宮) in Taipei, where the deity Baosheng Emperor celebrates his birthday during the third lunar month.

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Adagio hotel, Jinguashi: Experience the five senses with slow travel

For the environmentally-conscious traveler, slow travel has become the new way to see the world. With a belief that travel should be sustainable and leave a positive impact on the environment and surrounding communities, globe trekkers are now choosing to visit places that practice environmental conservation, sustainable development, and the preservation of local culture and traditions.
For the founders of the Adagio hotel in Jinguashi, Taiwan, (“Adagio” meaning “in a slow tempo”) slow travel is also an art meant to be experienced leisurely with all five senses. Throughout the month of March, Adagio holds a series of events that allow guests to enjoy a sensory experience for the ears (musical performances), the eyes (art classes), the nose (fragrance and incense workshops), the mouth (wine tasting, for example), and the hands (plant designing classes).
The hotel is located high up in the mountainous roads, not far from the Golden Waterfall. A cozy vicinity with no cable, Adagio is a hotel that creates a sense of community, with a limited number of rooms and group activities that allow you to meet other guests.

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Honoring Children’s Day in Taiwan, Taroko Gorge to be Child-Proofed

April 1, 2019: Citing concerns that not enough is being done to encourage families with small children to experience the majesty of Taiwan’s most famous scenic area, Taiwan’s Ministry of Unspecified Services has announced joint plans with local authorities to Child-Proof Taroko Gorge for this year’s Children’s Day Festival. On April 4th, 2019, Nineteen kilometers of the famous gorge stretching from the Taroko Park Visitor’s Center westward past the village of Tienxiang will be filled with approximately fifteen trillion colorful plastic balls, turning the most visited stretch of Taiwan’s most beloved scenic area into a child-friendly ball pit.   

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